CSE 118: Applications in Ubiquitous Computing (Fall 2013)

Lecture (research topic/papers discussion): 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30pm-4:50pm,
EBU3B 2154 (CSE Building)

Discussion (projects discussion/troubleshooting): 
Wednesdays, 2:00pm-2:50am,
EBU3B 2154

Lab (Space Available for experimenting): 
Mondays, 2:00pm-2:50pm,
EBU3B B260 Computer Lab

Course website: http://thiscourse.com/ucsd/cse118/fa13/

Recent Announcements (more)

Google Glass Project schedule and instructions are posted on the class web page.
From this week on we start Glass development... It is going to be fun!

N.Weibel
(Thu Oct 17, 12:28 a.m.)

Just to remind everyone, starting next week we will only be accepting the annotated papers, not the QA form. We suggest you continue to fill out the QA form to help solidify your thoughts and questions, but it's up to you. Some of you have been highlighting things in a PDF viewer and that's fine, you'll just have to start making notes too.


We're also adding the reading section of the rubric next week. You can refer to How to Read an Engineering Research Paper if you have any questions about the different parts of a paper that we're asking you to identify.

(Tue Oct 15, 9:11 p.m.)

Instructors

Dr. Nadir Weibel (Professor)

/ phone: (858) 534-8637

http://weibel.ucsd.edu

Office Hours: Thursdays, 2.30pm-3.30pm in CSE 3224

Eric Seidel (TA)

http://eseidel.org

Office Hours: Thursdays, 11:00-12:00 in CSE B260A

Course Description

The advent of affordable sensors and interaction devices (e.g., web cams, mobile phone based sensors, digital pensMicrosoft SenseCamMicrosoft KinectGoogle glasses, etc.) and wireless mobile computing devices (e.g., mobile smart phones, Arduino boards with 802.11b wireless connectivity, etc.) has created boundless opportunities for in-the-world computing applications that can transform our lives.

This course explores these opportunities in the form of both a project-based class and a preparatory course for graduate school

On the one hand we will explore the development of small applications or interaction techniques based on those devices. On the other hand, we will learn how to read, present, and discuss research papers from the literature of ubiquitous computing, pervasive computing, and human-computer interaction. 

Every week a new ubiquitous computing device will be introduced and we will discuss the technology behind it, and how it has been used in research (i.e. reading and discussing technical and research papers). In addition we will form teams to undertake small research projects. The projects will involve the design and implementation of a ubiquitous computing application, based on one of the devices presented in class. We will focus on two technologies: Microsoft Kinect, and specifically the KinectFusion SDK, and Google Glass. The Kinect project will run through the whole quarter, while the Glass project will be a focused 1-week long "hackaton" project.

On Tuesdays and Thursdays we will introduce new technology and discuss research papers, while on Wednesdays we will speak about the research project and cover more general topics on research project execution, such as particular SDKs or methods rto be used. This section will also be an opportuinity to seek help and ask specific technical questions. The Mondays' Labs are an opportunity to exchange ideas with your peers in other groups and get a dedicated space in the lab in the basement.

Occasionally, distinguished guest lecturers working in ubiquitous computing and human-computer interaction will present their work, and there may be a "class trip" to specific research labs on UCSD campus or in the San Diego area.

The course will culminate in team presentations of the applications created and a final demo event for interested students and faculty.

Students will be graded based on their participation in the weekly paper discussion (reading and discussing), as well as their performance in the research project (see Details and Policies).


Groups

-Group 1: Ashwin Khurana, Ivy Chen, Victoria Ly, Cheng (Joshua) Cai, Yunhan (Elvira) Li

-Group 2: Chirag Toor, Alex Lee, Steven Nguyen, Kevin Katz, Emmett Jacobs

-Group 3 - UbiCook: Narine Cholakyan, Caitlin Cagampan, Hannah Chen, Justin Li, Steven Rick

-Group 4: Janet Barrientos, Perry Wilcox, Sam Rubin, Jon Colby

-Group 5: Jonathan Lin, Eric Crawford, Gregory Newbrough, Dan Neumann, Zishan Budhwani

-Group 6: Carla Sun, Karen Wu, Annie Chen, Alex Fung, Andrew Amodei

-Group 7: Allison Kawamoto, Raul Gomezcana, Brian Lai, Debbie Pan

-Group 8: Churen (Chu) Shao, Derek Huynh, Patrick Torbett, Kirsten Koa, Calvin Nguyen

-Group 9 - HiddenSight: Vincent Tan, Kristoffer Kopperud, Matthew Davis, Grace Song, Daniel Lei

-Group 10: David Wu, Kenny Cheung, Enrico Tanuwidjaja, Jessica Aceret and Bryan Tran


Google Glass Project Schedule

Week    Pickup Glass    Return Glass    Device 1 (White)    Device 2 (Dark Grey)
W410/1710/24Group 2Group 3
W510/2410/31Group 4
W610/3111/07
Group 9
W711/0711/14Group 10Group 1
W811/1411/21Group 5Group 6
W911/2112/3Group 8Group 7

Glass Bitbucket projects for all the groups are publicly available and reachable here: http://bitbucket.org/weibel/glass_cse118_X with the "X" being the group number (1,2,3,...10)

Course Details and Policies

PIAZZA

A specific Piazza page has been opened for CSE 118. Feel free to use it to communicate or discuss course-related matters

GRADING

This course is graded on two elements: discussion preparation and participation (50%), and project (50%).

Discussion, Preparation and Participation (50%)

This class cannot "run" unless you come to class thoroughly prepared. 
You will be doing the discussing, not me. Your preparation for class, and your active engagement during class are essential to the success of the course, your learning, and your grade.
I will be judging your participation based on what happens in class during the discussion (25%). Class participation records will be created during class by your peers (and me and the TA) marking up the discussion rubric. I will also be collecting your annotated readings and the 2-page reading form, in order to assess your preparation skills and give you feedback (25%). Your annotated readings will be graded based on the note taking rubric.

Relevant posts in the class forum will be used to increase your participation grade. The topics allowed here are broad, such as: continuing class discussion, forwarding relevant news items, and reporting your own ubicomp experiences.

The assessments will take into consideration how much you are learning over the course. The fact that you do not know how to read a technical paper or discuss it with peers at the beginning of the course will not impact your final grade. Thus, at the beginning I will be primarily grading effort, but by the end I will also be looking at the results.


Project, (50%)

The project will be graded on the following elements: final report (10%), final presentation (10%), final demonstration (10%) and peer evaluation (10%). The Google Glass project will be evaluated separately (10%).
I will assess the final report based on the completeness of the background information, the technical description of the developed application or prototype, the relevance for ubiquitous computing and HCI, and the novelty of the approach or the developed system.
I will assess the final presentation based on the engagement, the effectiveness in presenting the project itself and the results of your implementation, as well as the completeness of the information presented in the audio-visual presentation. 
The demonstration will also be assessed in terms of the presented prototype, the interest raised, and its actual "working state".

We will be using peer evaluations to help with project grading. For each project team member and yourself, you will be asked to assign a few grades in a small number of categories (e.g., effort and team player). These grades may affect your project grade up to 1 letter grade in either direction, up or down.

Finally, I will evaluate the week-long Google Glass project separately, based on the presented innovation and the capabilities of completing the project in a week (i.e. is the Glass application new and it works?)


ABSENCES

I will allow for 2 class absences (or non-preparations) over the quarter (e.g., for sickness, job interviews). The first week of class does not count.

In other words, I will drop the two lowest participation grades. Showing up ready to participate counts for a lot, even if you don't say much. I cannot accept the turn-in of a marked-up paper in lieu of coming to class; they are a package. 


GOOGLE GLASS PROJECT

For the Glass project, teams will have access to 1x Glass and 1x Android Nexus 4 for 1 week. The goal is to develop an application in the healthcare or physical activity domain. During that week the Kinect project must be stopped and the two Glass teams must focus on the Glass project.

In order to be successful every project must follow these points:

  • Glass and the Android device will be picked up after class on Thursday and returned before class on the next Thursday.
  • Teams will be assigned a Bitbucket git repository that they will use to store all the code and the resources used for this project.
  • Any of the code from the previous groups might be used, but this is *not* a requirement.
  • Within the Bitbucket code repository, teams will have to edit the default WIKI page and create one (or more) pages describing their specific project.
  • Deliverables for the project will be the Bitbucket repository and a 5min. video explaining and demonstrating the Google Glass application.



Course Schedule

Week Date Topic Readings Assignments Notes
0 Thu Sep 26 Lecture (CSE 2154): Introduction to CSE 118, Group Formation      
1 Tue Oct 01 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140) M. Weiser, "The Computer for the 21st Century". Scientific American, pp. 66-75, September 1991 Critical reading and annotating (no paper needs to be turned in)  
Wed Oct 02 Discussion Section (CSE 2154): Microsoft Kinect SDK (E. Seidel) http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/kinectforwindowsdev/Start.aspx Read the documentation and watch the videos  
Thu Oct 03 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140)
V. Bush, As We May Think, Atlantic Monthly, July 1945

Critical reading and annotating (no paper needs to be turned in)  
2 Tue Oct 08 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140): Kinect A. Wilson, "Using a depth camera as a touch sensor", ITS 2010 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper and 2-page reading form.  
Wed Oct 09 Discussion Section (CSE 2154): Google Glass (E. Seidel)      
Thu Oct 10 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 2217) S. Izadi et al, "KinectFusion: real-time 3D reconstruction and interaction using a moving depth camera", UIST 2011 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper and 2-page reading form.  
3 Tue Oct 15 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 2217): Glass S. Mann, "Through the Glass, Lightly", IEEE Technology and Society, 2012 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper and 2-page reading form.  
Wed Oct 16 Discussion Section (CSE 2154): Kinect Speech Recognition (Eric Seidel)      
Thu Oct 17 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140) -How to Give Effective Presentations: 21 Tips 5min. presentation of your group's project to elicit early feedback. No paper assignments! Presentation instead
4 Tue Oct 22 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140): Healthcare A. Sarcevic et al., "A Paper-Digital Interface for Information Capture and Display in Time-Critical Medical Work", PervasiveHealth 2012 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper  
Wed Oct 23 Discussion Section (CSE 2154)      
Thu Oct 24 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140) E. Larson et al, SpiroSmart: using a microphone to measure lung function on a mobile phone, Ubicomp 2012 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper  
5 Tue Oct 29 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140): Touch (& music) S. JordĂ  et al, The reacTable: exploring the synergy between live music performance and tabletop tangible interfaces, TEI 07 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper  
Wed Oct 30 Discussion Section (CSE 2154) No Discussion this week! Use this time to work on your projects!    
Thu Oct 31 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140): Pen and Tpuch K Hinckley, K Yatani, M Pahud, N Coddington, Pen+ touch= new tools. UIST 2010 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper  
6 Tue Nov 05 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion:  MOXIE S. Black, Why the Lean Startup Changes Everything, Harvard Business Review a) Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper

b) Prepare answers to the following questions about your Kinect Project:

1) Who are your customer segments?
2) Why are you developing the product?
3) What is the hypothesis that you would need to test by talking with the customer segments.


c) Prepare two short sentences about your Kinect project stating: what is the problem you are solving, for who are you solving it, and why do they care.
Jay Kunin will present the UCSD Moxie Center
Wed Nov 06 Discussion Section (CSE 2154) No Discussion this week! Use this time to work on your projects!    
Thu Nov 07 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140): Future Studies J. Mankoff et al., "Looking past yesterday's tomorrow: using futures studies methods to extend the research horizon", CHI 2013 a) Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper

b) Group Website including: name of the project, members of the group, description of the project. Send the link to weibel@ucsd.edu
 
7 Tue Nov 12 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140): SenseCam S Hodges, L Williams, E Berry, S Izadi, J Srinivasan, A Butler, G Smyth, N Kapur and K Wood, SenseCam: A Retrospective Memory Aid, Ubicomp 2006 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper  
Wed Nov 13 Discussion Section (CSE 2154)      
Thu Nov 14 Lecture (CSE 1202): SenseCam Experiences N. Caprani et al, Experiencing SenseCam: A Case Study Interview Exploring Seven Years Living with a Wearable Camera, SenseCam 2013 a) Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper

b) Prepare at least one question for the speaker.
Cathal Gurrin Talk in CSE 1202.
8 Tue Nov 19 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140): K. Koscher, A. Czeskis, F. Roesner, S. Patel, T. Kohno, S. Checkoway, DaD.on McCoy, B. Kantor, D. Anderson, H. Shacham, S. Savage, "Experimental Security Analysis of a Modern Automobile". IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy, 2010.  Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper  
Wed Nov 20 No Discussion because of student workers strike      
Thu Nov 21 Lecture (CSE 2154) and Paper Discussion (CSE 2154 and 4140) M. Langheinrich, "Privacy by design—principles of privacy-aware ubiquitous systems", UbiComp 2001 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper Introduction to writing tools for your report.
9 Tue Nov 26 Lecture (CSE 2154) H. Ishii, B. Ullmer, "Tangible bits: towards seamless interfaces between people, bits and atoms". CHI '97 Critical reading and annotating, hand-in annotated printed paper  
Wed Nov 27 Discussion Section (CSE 2154) How to give good presentations.    
Thu Nov 28 Thanksgiving (no class)      
10 Tue Dec 03 Projects Presentation (CSE 2154)      
Wed Dec 04 Discussion Section (CSE 2154)      
Thu Dec 05 Projects Presentation (CSE 2154)      
11 Tue Dec 10 Final Demo Afternoon and Reception